It’s official: Brits daydream about going on holiday around 3 hours every day

According to new research, it turns out we Brits are daydreamers. And most of us (82%) are dreaming about winning the lottery or going on holiday.

woman daydreaming

According to research conducted by Travel Republic, it turns out we Brits are daydreamers. And most of us (82%) are dreaming about winning the lottery or going on holiday.

Almost half (46%) of the respondents zone out when at work and transport themselves onto a beach, either walking along it or simply catching up on some rays. 40% enjoy poolside daydreams or drinking in a beautiful view.

The most likely time to daydream is 11:20 am and eight out of ten (82%) admit to letting their mind wander for up to three hours of each working day – that’s around 780 hours a year.

Where do we go when daydreaming about holidays?

The most popular holiday destinations to escape to are the USA (32%), followed by the Caribbean (29%), Spain (26%) and Italy (26%).

And when Brits are not daydreaming, even less time is being spent on work, as almost one quarter of working adults (23%) confess to having booked a holiday during work time.

Frank Rejwan, managing director at Travel Republic, said:

People escape from everyday stresses when on holiday and it seems that even imagining themselves elsewhere offers some of the same pleasure.

81% of our holiday bookings happen after midday, so it is no surprise that people are imagining themselves relaxing in the sunshine by 11.20 am.

What are the triggers for daydreaming?

Daydreaming can take place throughout the day, as over a third (36%) of adults say they indulge in daydreaming at their desks and almost a quarter (24%) have lost focus in meetings. Some daydreams have become so tempting, thatĀ almost half (46%) of Brits have imagined quitting their job to fulfil their dreams.

And when Brits are not daydreaming, even less time is being spent on work, as almost one quarter (23%) of working adults confess to having booked their dream holidays during work time, with over one-third of these (37%) spending an hour or more each day researching the perfect holiday.

Daydreaming is psychologically beneficial

Emma Kenny, TV psychologist, presenter and writer, said:

Daydreaming is psychologically beneficial because it often allows us to return to happy memories or provides visions of possibility, which make us feel hopeful. Knowing that you work so that you can go on holiday gives reason to your workday.

Which destination are you daydreaming off? Leave a comment…

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